The truck in the bush

Today I hauled my ass out of bed at when ever Miranda told me to and I drove her to work and decided that I would turn today into a photo wander (well really it was a photo drive because I have been a little under the weather) so I started driving with no real destination in mind and by 10 O’clock I had covered most of the east and south sides of the city all without even clicking a shutter. Did I mention that I am so tired of this town, and all its bland and mediocre sights and sounds? (my vespa and I are going to have good times in Vancouver I tell ya) so I started to head out of town on all the back roads I ended up in Leduc were I grabbed some food and went to sit at the airport waiting for planes to land or take off after a while I got tired of waiting and took off down more back roads. I drove all day with out even realizing it I made it to Pigeon Lake via gravel back roads. But the best photos of the day came from this farmyard on the east side of the 2.

This is a shot from an old truck that was in the bush at this nice woman farm. You see I pulled over by this scrape yard of old trucks and combines and started taking pictures when a woman who turned out to be the owner of the place pulled up in her car and asked what I was up to. After explaining that I was a photographer and that I liked to take pictures of old stuff she said well we keep the best stuff over close to home. Get in you car and follow me. So I did just that. And what was close to home was this tuck. This was a truck that her father had bought brand new in 1941 for the grand price of $5000 (much to his wife’s dismay I was told) she told me about how they considered a truck like this to be a larger truck and therefore required a different license kinda like a class one now. But they didn’t give out licenses as we know them now for the class one; they gave lapel pins that would denote your license to drive. You had to wear the pin while driving and renew the pin every year. I grabbed a bunch of photos and she said that she had to go but I was free to wander the yard at will and she was gone. And wonder I did.